Monday, 9 October 2017

The Atlantic Wolffish Anarhichas lupus, a.k.a. the "sea wolf" or "wolf eel" is a voracious ocean... The TerraMar Project originally shared: The Atlantic Wolffish Anarhichas lupus, a.k.a. the "sea wolf" or "wolf eel" is a voracious ocean predator. Confined to the cold waters of the North Atlantic Ocean, these animals actually have blood that produces natural anti-freeze compounds. Using their large head, powerful jaws, and canine teeth, the Atlantic Wolffish consumes hard-bodies invertebrates near the ocean floor. Atlantic Wolffish are actually considered to be a keystone species to North Atlantic food webs because of their impact on sea urchins and other invertebrate populations in rocky reef ecosystems. Generally not harmful to humans when in the ocean, the Atlantic Wolffish has gained a reputation by fishermen for being a dangerous animal when pulled from the sea. With such a powerful head and teeth, these animals have been known to bite just about anything that comes in contact with them, and to not let go. Considered a species of concern by NOAA, these animals are slow to mature and have experienced population declines in recent history. Atlantic Wolffish are considered "good eating", and have been fished for commercially and recreationally in the past which is likely the cause of their population decline. To learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans, visit us at: http://ift.tt/XJinpo Photo: Citron-Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)#marinespecies #wolffish #Atlantic #marinelife #TerraMar #keystonespecies View full size (1500x996)


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